What Moves The Dead – But Apparently Not The Living

The Fall of the House of Usher has occupied some space in my brain since the halcyon days of high school English class. Not only did I read it several times, but I never wrote the assigned paper, a fact that literally haunts my dreams. There is just something unnerving about Poe’s story that I’m…

Locklands – The End Of The World As We Know It

Locklands, the final piece of the Founders trilogy by Robert Jackson Bennett, is a story both worthy of discussion and hard to talk about. It is the last step in an increasingly complicated dance that Bennett has been leading and it ends with a beautiful flourish. Unfortunately, I can’t talk about the plot of this…

And Then I Woke Up – A Matryoshka Doll of Nightmares

Ominous titles portrayed on stunning covers that fill me with a sense of dread are a sure fire bet to getting my attention. Whether the book is a science fiction epic, or short jaunt through a fantastical realm, I’m always game when that lethal marketing combination is aimed my way. Malcolm Devlin’s tale of horror…

Stars and Bones – Missing The Marrow For The Bones

Last year I read Light Chaser, a collaboration between Peter F. Hamilton and Gareth L. Powell, and it birthed a desire to give Powell a deeper look. Having read a lot of Hamilton, my sense was that Powel’s work added a bit of blood to the sprawling imagination Hamilton usually provides. Instead of going with…

Far From The Light of Heaven – Breaking Outside the Box

After reading all of Wormwood last year, Tade Thompson became one of my to-watch authors because of his genre melding stories. While I haven’t made time to dive into his horror novella series Molly Southbourne, Thompson did decide to grace readers this year with a rollicking science fiction mystery, Far From The Light of Heaven.…

HEX – This Book Is Cursed And Not In A Good Way

Time for one last spooky book read before the end of October. Usually, it would be prudent to end this hallowed month with a bit of triumphalism. A reminder that all things spooky are good, and the genre's growing presence is reaffirmed. But folks, I have to tell you, I will not be able to…

Slewfoot – Capitalism Is The Real Devil

Time for another horror novel folks, and I have to say this one left me in a bit of a tizzy. Slewfoot, by Brom, is a slow burn historical horror that captures Puritan culture vividly, but falters when delivering on the horror and its themes. Slewfoot is the story of Abitha, an Englishwoman sold as…